FutureOfCapitalism.com

Go to Mobile Site

Cassidy Care

June 11, 2015 at 3:20 pm

Send Comment Share: Facebook Twitter

Bill Cassidy, a physician who is a Republican senator representing Louisiana, has introduced the Patient Freedom Act, which would address the consequences if the Supreme Court decides King v. Burwell in a way that eliminates ObamaCare subsidies for five to ten million people in states that haven't established their own exchanges. A press release from Dr. Cassidy reports:

Original cosponsors include Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-KY), Majority Whip John Cornyn (R-TX), Sens. David Vitter (R-LA), Dan Coats (R-IN), Susan Collins (R-ME), Jim Inhofe (R-OK) and Mike Rounds (R-SD). A companion bill will be introduced in the U.S. House of Representatives by Dr. Ralph Abraham (R-LA).

Continue Reading

 

Hydraulic Fracturing Energy Opportunity

June 11, 2015 at 1:50 pm

Send Comment Share: Facebook Twitter

Harvard Business School's Michael Porter and the Boston Consulting Group are out with a new report, America's Unconventional Energy Opportunity, that is very much worth a look for those interested in economic policy or energy investing. Conservatives won't like the fact that it calls for a "carbon charge" — a euphemism for a tax — or a cap-and-trade system. The rest of the report focuses on the economic growth opportunity in the U.S. domestic natural gas and oil industry and the potential for exports.

Submit a Comment

 

Minimum Wage Laws Exempting Unions

June 11, 2015 at 12:18 pm

Send Comment Share: Facebook Twitter

"Living wage" laws mandating $15 an hour pay rates in Los Angeles and SeaTac include language that "would, in effect, exempt unionized workplaces," a USA Today editorial notices. Says the editorial, "The real motivation appears to be to promote unionization. By getting cities to dramatically increase the minimum wage, unions can claim they are fighting on behalf of all workers. By including opt-out clauses for themselves, they can use these new laws as a weapon to pressure companies to unionize."

It's almost unbelievable that this would be a union bargaining approach with an employer: in essence, "Recognize our union and allow us to collect union dues from your employees, and in return, we'll give you access to an exemption in the law that allows you to pay a sub-minimum wage."

Submit a Comment

 

Christie's Tax Incentives

June 10, 2015 at 12:44 pm

Send Comment Share: Facebook Twitter

Expansion of food manufacturing and distribution in New Jersey is the topic of an article in the New York Times real estate section. It reports on a "30 million, 10-year tax break" for "Wenner Bread Products, which signed a lease for space in New Brunswick last year, moving the bulk of its operations from Long Island," New York. And it reports on the food company Goya: "An $82 million, 10-year tax credit from the state persuaded the company to stay."

Governing magazine took a tough look at Christie's tax incentives a few years back and found that Goldman Sachs was one of the largest recipients.

Continue Reading

 

Adam Bellow on Book TV

June 9, 2015 at 10:41 pm

Send Comment Share: Facebook Twitter

Adam Bellow, who has edited Sarah Palin, Dinesh D'Souza, Arthur Brooks, Charles Murray, and James Q. Wilson, has a very nice interview with C-Span's Book TV about publishing conservative books. "I'm a capitalist," he says at one point.

Submit a Comment

 

GE Looks To Leave Connecticut

June 9, 2015 at 1:19 pm

Send Comment Share: Facebook Twitter

GE is considering moving its corporate headquarters out of Connecticut after the Nutmeg State's latest tax increase, National Review reports. The publication links to an email from GE CEO Jeff Immelt, who writes, "As a result of this law passing, I have assembled an exploratory team to look into the company's options to relocate corporate HQ to another state with a more pro-business environment...Our taxes have been raised five times since 2011...This will be the second highest tax increase in the state's history behind only the more than $2 billion tax hike passed in 2011."

1 Reader Comment

 

Walker's Stadium Subsidy

June 9, 2015 at 10:53 am

Send Comment Share: Facebook Twitter

Wisconsin governor Scott Walker's support for a $250 million taxpayer subsidy for a new basketball arena for the Milwaukee Bucks NBA team comes in for some criticism from the Cato Institute's David Boaz in this Huffington Post article. Mr. Boaz notes the team is owned by three money managers: James Dinan of York Capital, Marc Lasry of Avenue Capital, and Wes Edens of Fortress. All three are major Democratic donors, federal campaign finance records show, though Mr. Edens has also given some money to Carly Fiorina, John McCain, and Rudolph Giuliani.

1 Reader Comment

 

John Fitzgerald Cruz

June 8, 2015 at 4:41 pm

Send Comment Share: Facebook Twitter

Senator Ted Cruz is sounding the theme from the book JFK, Conservative on the presidential campaign trail, my column reports this week. Please check the column out at the New York Sun (here), Reason (here), and Newsmax (here).

Submit a Comment

 

ObamaCare in Vermont

June 4, 2015 at 1:54 pm

Send Comment Share: Facebook Twitter

The New York Times has an unflinching look at the problems with ObamaCare in Vermont:

Despite an eventual cost of up to $200 million in federal funds, its online marketplace, or exchange, is still not fully functional, while disgust with the system is running deep among residents and lawmakers alike....

The bitterness stems partly from the fact that Vermont had some of the biggest elements of the Affordable Care Act in place long before it took effect. Health insurance companies here already could not refuse to cover people, or charge them more, if they had pre-existing medical conditions. The state also already had more generous Medicaid eligibility rules than most, and programs that helped lower-income people pay for private insurance, which made it less expensive for many than the new exchange plans.

Continue Reading

 

Two Questionable Prosecutions

June 3, 2015 at 10:41 pm

Send Comment Share: Facebook Twitter

Ruth Marcus, writing in the Washington Post, runs against the journalistic pack and argues that the prosecutions of Dennis Hastert and the international soccer officials may not be the wisest use of resources:

Not every bad act is a crime. Not every bad act that can technically be categorized as a crime should be pursued by prosecutors. And not every bad act that clearly amounts to a crime should be pursued by prosecutors in the United States.

Link via the Facebook feed of Donald Graham, who liked the column.

1 Reader Comment

 

Amazon Subsidy

June 3, 2015 at 12:32 pm

Send Comment Share: Facebook Twitter

The Columbus (Ohio) Dispatch has an editorial celebrating a deal for a new data center between Amazon and the state of Ohio, which is led by a Republican governor, John Kasich: "The state has approved tax incentives for the project valued at an estimated $81 million. That isn't a handout, but a benefit that Amazon will earn as it actually invests and creates jobs here."

When advocates of a special tax break for a big business need to specify or insist that it "isn't a handout," it's usually a pretty good indication that it is precisely that. I don't fault Amazon for using the competition between states to try to get the best deal it can to increase profits for its shareholders and lower costs for customers. But a one-low-tax-rate-for-everyone approach is, for a whole lot of reasons, preferable to these kinds of special deals, regardless of whether the word used to describe the special deals is "benefit" or "handout."

Submit a Comment

 

Federal Funds for Beachfront Vacation Home

June 3, 2015 at 11:01 am

Send Comment Share: Facebook Twitter

A $1 million, 4 bedroom, 3.5 bathroom beachfront home in Massachusetts that is owned by a Florida woman is getting moved and rebuilt with a $180,000 federal grant, according to an article by the New England Center for Investigative Reporting that highlights some of the problems with the federal flood insurance program:

The program is now more than $20 billion in debt and relies on billions from the federal government to stay afloat.

Congress attempted to end the program's premium subsidies in a 2012 law, but backlash over the enormous proposed increases to how much people would have to pay for flood insurance – coupled with new federal flood maps that assigned skyrocketing premiums to homeowners never hit by water – triggered a new, less onerous law.

This particular home, "damaged at least 10 times by Atlantic storms," is a repeat beneficiary: "The house was first raised about three feet with a $40,000 federal grant about a dozen years ago. This time, it will go up five feet more."

1 Reader Comment

 

Juxtaposition of the Week

June 3, 2015 at 10:41 am

Send Comment Share: Facebook Twitter

"'Inequality' represents one of a half-dozen books dealing with the subject that Harvard University Press alone has published on the subject since it introduced the translation of Professor Piketty's opus to the United States market last year." — From Jonathan Knee's New York Times book review of Inequality: What Can Be Done by Anthony B. Atkinson.

Continue Reading

 

Bush Grabs the Dollar Issue

June 2, 2015 at 1:53 pm

Send Comment Share: Facebook Twitter

Those who have been waiting for the monetary policy issue to come to the forefront in this presidential campaign finally got the moment they have been waiting for this weekend during Jeb Bush's appearance on WMUR television in New Hampshire.

In response to a question from a voter about whether foreign currency manipulation had put American manufacturers at a disadvantage, Governor Bush turned the question around: "You can make a case that in the last few years, given our monetary policy, that we've been manipulating our currency," Governor Bush said. "We've never had a time where our central bank is just printing money like nobody's business. And that depreciates our currency. It lowers our interest rates and depreciates our currency."

Continue Reading

 

Dodd-Frank and the Dome House

June 2, 2015 at 12:45 pm

Send Comment Share: Facebook Twitter

A New York Times article reports on a 2,500-square-foot dome-shaped house that is for sale on 28 acres of land in New Paltz, N.Y.:

David B. South, head of the Monolithic Dome Institute and a builder of dome houses, schools and athletic facilities of his own design, said his Texas-based company was erecting as many as 100 homes a year until regulations like the Dodd-Frank Act took effect, forcing banks to look harder at the marketability of the homes they were underwriting. "Now it's eight to 10 a year if we're lucky," Mr. South said.

"It's all Congress's fault," he said. "A man should be able to build whatever home he wants and can afford."

Continue Reading

 

<- Prev 15 items   |   Next 15 items ->

Subscribe to the Mailing List


Follow Us On:

Facebook    Twitter    RSS    Join Mailing List

ADVERTISEMENT

© 2015 FutureOfCapitalism, LLC.

home  |  archives  |  about  |  mailing list  |  how to help  |  FoC @ facebook  |  FoC @ twitter  |  terms of use  |  privacy policy

news transparency  |  smartertimes